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WRITING BLOGS

Trauma Journalism

Dart Center (for Journalism & Trauma) Academic Fellowship Program offers in-depth training for journalism educators to learn skills and develop university curricula on reporting, storytelling and self-care when covering crisis, conflict and tragedy. The program, which began in 2010, has awarded more than 25 fellowships to educators from North America, Europe and Australia. Workshop training is held each June at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. According to Dart Center’s Meg Spratt: "Each fellow has shown a passion and commitment for learning more about trauma and applying that knowledge to their journalism teaching." http://dartcenter.org/content/2011-dart-academic-fellows-named http://dartcenter.org/content/dart-center-announces-academic-fellows Read More 
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Trauma Journalism

Wall Street Journal reporter Amy Dockser Marcus began her media career as a 12-year-old columnist for her hometown (Lexington, Mass.) weekly newspaper. She believes that journalism is a tool that empowers people, especially those outside the system. Marcus says her years of trauma coverage have made her more compassionate: "The essence of telling these stories is to be humble. My obligation is to bring issues to light and to help people look at things in a new way." Read More 
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Trauma Journalism

Dr. Anthony Feinstein, trauma journalism scholar and therapist, developed an online diagnostic instrument on the International News Safety Institute (INSI) website. The anonymous risk awareness survey ("How is Your Emotional Health? Test Yourself") was created to assist news media professionals who suspect they might have post-traumatic stress issues.
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Trauma Journalism

"A hard hitting, insightful look at an often overlooked topic by an exceptionally prolific writer. Author Mark Masse' exposes and examines the emotional and psychological toll paid by journalists covering horrific events. In his new book, Trauma Journalism: On Deadline in Harm's Way, Mark does his usual exemplary job as a wordsmith in taking a difficult and complex topic and relating it to the common human experience. This is a great book for anyone who works in the news business, is thinking of a career in journalism or just appreciates the hard work of the men and women who cover tragic events. A fantastic read and a great gift idea for the holidays!" (Joe Krupa, former emergency medical technician) Read More 
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Trauma Journalism

Former Virginia Tech Collegiate Times editor Amie Steele in a 2009 dartcenter.org article: “I realized there was a story behind the victims. And while we had our notebooks and recorders out during those weeks writing about people’s emotions, we weren’t dealing with our own. Journalists are too often covering heartbreaking, emotional stories. At the end of the day, I think it is important for journalists to come to terms with the grave things they may see while covering a story— not only for their sanity but for their reporting. While it is important for you to tell that person’s story, your health is important too.” Read More 
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Trauma Journalism

Experts cite several factors in determining how individuals deal with exposure to tragedy and trauma. Factors include upbringing, personality, work experience, work environment and many other life lessons and influences. Young reporters may encounter trauma effects due to inexperience. Veteran reporters may have severe emotional impact after reaching a psychological threshold (tipping point).
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Trauma Journalism

My thanks to the faculty, staff and students of Syracuse University Newhouse School of Public Communications for their support during my presentation on Nov. 17. Appreciated the opportunity to discuss my book TRAUMA JOURNALISM: ON DEADLINE IN HARM'S WAY and participate in Q&A.
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Trauma Journalism

Former journalist Melissa Manware described the emotional toll of nearly 10 years of police-beat reporting in a Quill magazine article. She also commented on the role of empathy: “A reporter who really cares about a story will almost always do a better job of telling it. Stories change lives, they give voices to the voiceless and, most importantly, they remind all of us of our humanity.” Read More 
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Trauma Journalism

American Journalism Review author and professor Sherry Ricchiardi cites an emerging area of concern for news organizations: how to protect reporters operating in areas dominated by organized crime? Journalists across Eastern Europe have been intimidated, assaulted and their families threatened because of investigative research on spreading mafia activity.
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Trauma Journalism

www.journalistsatrisk.org is a free resource for conflict reporters and other news personnel. The website is an online community of media professionals with experience in hostile environments. It includes a community discussion board, a “KnowledgeBase,” safety tips, online maps, and other resources. Sample Tip of the Day: “Never carry a weapon or travel with journalists who do. Be prudent in taking pictures and know local sensitivities about (conflict) photography. Seek the agreement of soldiers before shooting images.” Read More 
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